Mastering the Art of Facilities Maintenance

managing time and resources effectively

Remote Monitoring

Having a computerized monitoring system in your building can be a great way to have continual, updated and current information about your facility and the systems that keep it running.
Today’s embedded devices are lowering the cost of remote monitoring, and it is no longer necessary to have a complete building automation system in order to connect your equipment to the internet for text, email, or web alerts. Here’s a few examples of some really great products to get you started:
The IP-PC 101 from Mamac Systems is a small embedded router with sensor inputs that you can connect directly to your existing ethernet network. This is great for monitoring a set of pumps, a boiler, rooftop unit, etc. I have one that I use for testing and I really think it is a powerful application of xml and embedded software.

The IOLogic W5340 from Moxa is another great application of embedded technology, and has the added feature of built-in cellular connectivity. Although it is a little pricier than the MAMAC device, it has a few more bells and whistles and can be a “standalone” device meaning you don’t have to use an existing ethernet connection if you connect it to a cellular plan. With built-in GPS, it can also be used for monitoring and tracking mobile assets.

If you need to monitor multiple devices across a campus, you may want to take another step up in functionality (and cost) and look into a Red Lion G3 System Interface connected to wireless Banner input devices. These can be connected and networked wirelessly to create a more comprehensive monitoring (and control) network of devices.

Whatever the application, remote monitoring can be a way to create peace-of-mind when full-time staffing isn’t a practical option, and receive alerts for system outages, set up sensing points to monitor voltage, temperature, humidity, pressure and a seemingly limitless plethora of sensing devices.

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October 29, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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